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The Do’s and Don’ts of Religion in the Classroom

 Some public school teachers fear to mention anything to do with religion in the classroom. Some schools and districts even forbid celebrating holidays associated with one religion. Sometimes it’s easier to avoid a subject rather than deal with questions and criticism from parents or administrations. Avoidance can be extremely difficult during religious holidays and deprives children of forming a comprehensive understanding of diversity and culture. It is important to teach

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Teaching About Kwanzaa in the Classroom

While falling around the same time as Christmas and Hanukkah, being celebrated December 26 – January 1, Kwanzaa is different in that it is not a religious holiday at all. Instead, it is a celebration of life that some African Americans (mostly from the United States) celebrate each year. Kwanzaa was established in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to observe African culture and motivate and encourage African Americans. The name

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Teaching Culture: Hanukkah

Even though over 39% of the Jewish population lives in the United States, many people don’t know too many basic facts about Hanukkah. With the holiday starting Sunday, December 2nd this year, I figured now is the perfect time to break down some of the basics of this Jewish holiday. First and foremost, what is Hanukkah the celebration of? The Syrian-Greeks forbade the Jewish religion and desecrated a holy Temple

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Creating a Community of Students who Have Meaningful Academic Conversations

One of the main purposes of Common Core State Standards (or any other named standards your state goes by) is to teach children to think and respond critically. When I was in the classroom, one of my main goals was to lead my students towards independence by running the classroom and leading critical thinking discussions with their peers. Often, administrators, coaches, and other teachers would come into my room and

read more »

The Do’s and Don’ts of Religion in the Classroom

 Some public school teachers fear to mention anything to do with religion in the classroom. Some schools and districts even forbid celebrating holidays associated with one religion. Sometimes it’s easier to avoid a subject rather than deal with questions and criticism from parents or administrations. Avoidance can be extremely difficult during religious holidays and deprives children of forming a comprehensive understanding of diversity and culture. It is important to teach

read more »

Teaching About Kwanzaa in the Classroom

While falling around the same time as Christmas and Hanukkah, being celebrated December 26 – January 1, Kwanzaa is different in that it is not a religious holiday at all. Instead, it is a celebration of life that some African Americans (mostly from the United States) celebrate each year. Kwanzaa was established in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to observe African culture and motivate and encourage African Americans. The name

read more »

Teaching Culture: Hanukkah

Even though over 39% of the Jewish population lives in the United States, many people don’t know too many basic facts about Hanukkah. With the holiday starting Sunday, December 2nd this year, I figured now is the perfect time to break down some of the basics of this Jewish holiday. First and foremost, what is Hanukkah the celebration of? The Syrian-Greeks forbade the Jewish religion and desecrated a holy Temple

read more »

Creating a Community of Students who Have Meaningful Academic Conversations

One of the main purposes of Common Core State Standards (or any other named standards your state goes by) is to teach children to think and respond critically. When I was in the classroom, one of my main goals was to lead my students towards independence by running the classroom and leading critical thinking discussions with their peers. Often, administrators, coaches, and other teachers would come into my room and

read more »
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